Category Archives: Documenting Freedom

November 24, 2016

Regnery: Attorney General Jeff Sessions — Liberals’ Worst Nightmare

Alabama Republican Sen. Jeff Sessions’ strong stands on immigration, and law and order, are not the only reasons liberals want to kill his nomination for Attorney General. It is also because he knows what the Obama Administration has done to the Justice Department and he knows how to bring it back where it belongs—the center of equal justice under the rule of law.

Few people know better than Sessions how to purge the Department of leftist ideology, and how to cut off the large sums of money flowing to leftist non-profiits. For leftists, ideology and money make up a potent combination, and they will do anything to try to preserve it.

The Justice Department became the headquarters of Obama’s campaign to transform America. The building on Constitution Avenue, complete with a blinded statue of lady justice at its front door and “Equal Justice under Law” inscribed on its façade, became the public-interest-law-firm, think tank, and money spigot for the ideological left.

The Justice Department is arguably the most powerful domestic branch of the federal government. Its arms reach into every facet of American life (and not a few places off shore as well), into every courtroom, into every state capitol, every police department, every business, every voting booth, even every Indian reservation, and much more. With some 100,000 employees and a budget of $27 billion, its power, particularly to those on its wrong side, is limitless.

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Complete text linked here.

July 4, 2015

The Declaration of Independence (as read by Max McLean)

The Declaration of Independence was a statement adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776, which announced that the thirteen American colonies, then at war with Great Britain, regarded themselves as independent states, and no longer a part of the British Empire. John Adams put forth a resolution earlier in the year which made a formal declaration inevitable. A committee was assembled to draft the formal declaration, to be ready when congress voted on independence. Adams persuaded the committee to select Thomas Jefferson to compose the original draft of the document, which congress would edit to produce the final version. The Declaration was ultimately a formal explanation of why Congress had voted on July 2 to declare independence from Great Britain, more than a year after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War. The Independence Day of the United States of America is celebrated on July 4, the day Congress approved the wording of the Declaration.