Category Archives: Jordan Peterson

July 23, 2017

Biblical Series III: God and the Hierarchy of Authority – Jordan B. Peterson (Video)

In this lecture, I tried to outline something like this: for anything to be, there has to be a substrate (call it a potential) from which it emerges, a structure that provides the possibility of imposing order on that substrate, and the act of ordering, itself. So the first is something like the precosmogonic chaos (implicitly feminine); the second, God the Father; the third, what the Christian West has portrayed as the Son (the Word of Truth).

July 20, 2017

Ben Shapiro on Jordan Peterson and Leftist Stupidity (Video)

Benjamin Aaron Shapiro is an American conservative political commentator, nationally syndicated columnist, author, radio talk show host, and attorney. He is editor-in-chief of DailyWire.com, and host of “The Ben Shapiro Show.

July 14, 2017

Biblical Series II: Genesis 1: Chaos & Order – Jordan B. Peterson (Video)

Lecture II in my Psychological Significance of the Biblical Stories from May 23 at Isabel Bader Theatre, Toronto. In this lecture, I present Genesis 1, which presents the idea that a pre-existent cognitive structure (God the Father) uses the Logos, the Christian Word, the second Person of the Trinity, to generate habitable order out of precosmogonic chaos at the beginning of time. It is in that Image that Man and Woman are created — indicating, perhaps, that it is (1) through speech that we participate in the creation of the cosmos of experience and (2) that what true speech creates is good.

July 12, 2017

Biblical Series I: Introduction to the Idea of God – Jordan B. Peterson (Video)

Lecture I in my Psychological Significance of the Biblical Stories series from May 16th at Isabel Bader Theatre in Toronto. In this lecture, I describe what I consider to be the idea of God, which is at least partly the notion of sovereignty and power, divorced from any concrete sovereign or particular, individual person of power. I also suggest that God, as Father, is something akin to the spirit or pattern inherent in the human hierarchy of authority, which is based in turn on the dominance hierarchies characterizing animals.

Jordan B Peterson – Mental Strength for Overcoming Fear & Building your Dreams (Video)

Dr. Jordan B Peterson a Canadian clinical psychologist and professor of psychology at the University of Toronto who has published more than a hundred scientific papers, transforming the modern understanding of personality, and revolutionized the psychology of religion with his book, Maps of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief. As a Harvard professor, he was nominated for the prestigious Levinson Teaching Prize, and is regarded by his students as one of three truly life-changing teachers.

July 5, 2017

Maps of Meaning – by Jordan B Peterson – Audiobook

Why have people from different cultures and eras formulated myths and stories with similar structures? What does this similarity tell us about the mind, morality, and structure of the world itself? Jordan Peterson offers a provocative new hypothesis that explores the connection between what modern neuropsychology tells us about the brain and what rituals, myths, and religious stories have long narrated.

Controversial U of T professor making nearly $50,000 a month through crowdfunding

Prof. Jordan Peterson, who made headlines last fall when he publicly refused to use gender neutral pronouns, aims to “take the humanities back” from university establishments after surpassing $45,000 monthly fundraising goal.

A controversial University of Toronto psychology professor is making nearly $50,000 per month through crowdfunding, from a base of supporters that was ignited in large part by the professor’s anti-political correctness views.

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He is now harnessing his online clout with eyes on a new goal — to offer an online university degree in the humanities for which students pay only for examinations.

“I’m fighting this as a battle of ideas,” Peterson told the Star. “Hopefully I can bring high-quality education to millions of people — for nothing. Wouldn’t that be cool.”

Peterson said he views university establishments as “the next best thing to a cult” due to their focus on what he calls “postmodern” themes such as equity. He says his independent project will contrast the university model by providing straight humanities education.

For about his first seven months on Patreon, Peterson earned about $1,000 per month. That changed last October, when he saw a dramatic increase in support, which has not slowed. The professor surpassed a fundraising goal of $45,000 on June 10, and is now aiming for $100,000 per month. On Monday, Peterson was making $49,460 every month from 4,432 patrons.

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June 29, 2017

Jordan Peterson Explains That Collectivism Is Tyranny Under the Guise of Benevolence

Under most regimes—from Vladimir Lenin, to Adolf Hitler, to Josef Stalin, to Mao Zedong—it led to dictatorship and crimes against humanity.

Collectivist regimes under communism, fascism, and socialism make the individual’s rights secondary to the goals of a political system—the opposite of free societies, where the system acts to guard the rights of the individual. Collectivism holds that the individual should serve the interests of the state, and that any who oppose the interest of the collective should be ostracized or eliminated.

Despite the tyrannical nature of collectivism, people are fooled into following this system through its feigned benevolence, and through the system’s identification of “enemies” that its followers can struggle against.

The ideology of collectivism is built on a dysfunctional understanding of caring for others and on a narrow reinterpretation of history, according to Jordan Peterson, Canadian clinical psychologist and professor of psychology at the University of Toronto.

The Complexity of Caring

“Caring for someone or for a group of people is a very complicated thing,” Peterson said, noting that simply feeling sorry for a group because they’re downtrodden is “not good enough.”

Short-term solutions aim to comfort people in their current conditions, while long-term solutions aim to pull them out of suffering. The long-term process means that rather than give a man a fish, you teach him to fish—a process that takes effort on both sides.

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June 24, 2017

Jordan Peterson Explains How Communism Spread Under the Guise of Identity Politics

By the end of the 1960s, he said, even French intellectuals like Jean-Paul Sartre had to admit that the communist experiment—whether under Marxism, Stalinism, Maoism, or any other variant—was “an absolute, catastrophic failure.”

Communism was not popularized in the West under the direct banner of communism. Instead, it came largely under the banner of postmodernism, and aimed to transform the values and beliefs of our societies through its Marxist idea that knowledge and truth are social constructs.

Under it, a new wave of skepticism and distrust was applied to philosophy, culture, history, and all beliefs and institutions at the foundations of Western society.

The postmodern philosophy “came into vogue” in the 1970s, according to Jordan Peterson, Canadian clinical psychologist and professor of psychology at the University of Toronto, “after classic Marxism, especially of the economic type, had been so thoroughly discredited that no one but an absolute reprobate could support it publicly.”

Peterson said it’s not possible to understand our current society without considering the role postmodernism plays within it, “because postmodernism, in many ways—especially as it’s played out politically—is the new skin that the old Marxism now inhabits.”

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June 22, 2017

Jordan Peterson: Strategy (1): 12 principles for a 21st century conservatism (Video)

Conservatism has all-too-often found itself unable to articulate a coherent positive doctrine. By this I mean specifically that the laudable conservative tendency to preserve the best of past has too-often manifested itself in a series of “thou shalt not” statements, instead of laying out a manifesto of fundamental values that might serve to unite people around a set of common ambitions. I am attempting to rectify this problem with this statement of principles, some of which I believe might have the additional virtue of being attractive to young people, looking for mature and forthright purpose and responsibility. I am not making the claim that the statement is perfect, comprehensive or final.