Category Archives: Poverty

November 12, 2017

For many Palm Springs homeless, heroin comes before food and water. The problem is getting worse

Far away from the worst of a national crisis, heroin is still taking hold of people living on the streets.

The day started off lucky for Blake Pricer. Overnight, he had locked himself in a laundry room at the Ace Hotel in Palm Springs and slept a few hours in relative safety. After waking up to the sound of pounding on the door from hotel staff wanting to reclaim the territory, Pricer was back on the street and back to his relentless quest.

The one thing Pricer needed was heroin, which meant the first thing he needed was cash. Good fortune came through when he began opening mailboxes and quickly found $13 and some checks he hoped to sell later.

With that small amount of money in his hand, Pricer, who is 26, thin and tattooed with shorts hanging past his knees, easily found someone to sell him the drug. He then rode a stolen bicycle downtown to a cooling center where homeless people like him could rest, eat and take a shower. He parked the bike and walked inside to a bathroom where he clandestinely injected heroin into his arm. It wasn’t quite 9 a.m.

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Complete text linked here.

November 7, 2017

Jerry Brown and the state Democrats’ legacy is crime and homelessness

Mass release of criminals combined with the decriminalization of petty crime has led to encampments full of the desperate and dangerous. This mess is so bad that the Santa Ana River is now known by local residents as “Skid River.”

There’s not much the state of California does efficiently. If you need to get your license plates in the mail, want your tax refund, or God forbid need Sacramento to fix a clerical error, you need the patience of a saint — the bureaucrats will do things in their own sweet time, whether you like it or not.

But when it comes to the wholesale emptying of the prisons, they’re Johnny-on-the-spot.

Whether it’s Assembly Bill 109, Proposition 47 or Proposition 57, Gov. Jerry Brown and the Democrat-controlled state Legislature seemingly can’t put violent criminals on the streets fast enough.

Just think of them as being the O.J. Simpson jury with term limits.

Recently, I wrote a column about Senate Bill 620 — which would strip mandatory sentencing enhancements for criminals convicted of committing a felony with a gun — and noted that legislation like this has resulted in a ballooning crime rate and homeless population.

I made this claim based on various conversations I’ve had with local law enforcement, city officials and litigators, but was having a tough time finding hard data.

And as it turns out, I’m not the only one.

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Complete text linked here.

September 28, 2017

California leads the nation — in poverty

Unsurprisingly, California is perennially ranked as one of the worst states in the country in terms of perceived business friendliness. This year, the state again ranked dead last — as it has for the past 13 years — in a survey of hundreds of CEOs by Chief Executive magazine on measures of business friendliness, with the state ranked the worst in the taxation and regulation category.

One in five Californians live in poverty, according to a new U.S. Census Bureau report.

Using the Supplemental Poverty Measure, which accounts for regional cost-of-living, the average poverty rate in California from 2014 through 2016 stood at 20.4 percent, the highest among the states and second only to the District of Columbia’s 21 percent average. The national average over that period of time was 14.7 percent.

Despite boasting one of the largest economies in the world, California has consistently topped national rankings of poverty. While the state only accounts for about 12 percent of the national population, for example, Californians comprise one-third of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families beneficiaries.

One of the largest factors driving California’s shamefully high poverty rates is the high cost of housing.

According to a draft report on the housing crisis by the California Department of Housing and Community Development, “production averaged less than 80,000 new homes annually over the last 10 years, and ongoing production continues to fall far below the projected need of 180,000 additional homes annually.”

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August 14, 2017

Why does California have the nation’s highest poverty level?

Another indicator of California’s impoverishment is that more than a third of its 39 million residents are enrolled in Medi-Cal, the state-federal program of medical care for the poor.

With all the recent hoopla about California’s record-low unemployment rate and the heady prospect of its becoming No. 5 in global economic rankings, it is easy to lose sight of another salient fact: It is the nation’s most poverty-stricken state.

So says the U.S. Census Bureau in its “supplemental measure” of poverty, which is more accurate than the traditional measure because it takes into account not only income, but living costs.

By that measure, just over 20 percent of Californians are living in poverty. The Public Policy Institute of California has devised its own measure, similar to the Census Bureau’s, that not only validates the 20 percent figure, but tells us that another 20 percent of Californians are in “near-poverty,” which means they struggle to pay for food, shelter and other necessities of life.

Another indicator of California’s impoverishment is that more than a third of its 39 million residents are enrolled in Medi-Cal, the state-federal program of medical care for the poor. And that doesn’t count a few million more who cannot legally obtain Medi-Cal coverage because they are undocumented immigrants.

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Complete text linked here.

June 27, 2017

Starving Venezuelans Risk 60 Miles of Open Ocean to Barter for Food

The Marxist Maduro regime is being propped up by neigboring countries that continue to support and do business with it, despite the atrocities. Wall Street is involved as well, with Goldman Sachs coming under fire for buying $2.8 billion worth of bonds (now named “hunger bonds”) for pennies on the dollar.

The end stages of socialism in Venezuela are forcing citizens to do anything they can to obtain food for themselves and their families, including risking their lives. Mariana Revilla, a medical doctor reduced to making midnight excursions over 60 miles of open ocean to feed her family, was making her fifth trip to Trinidad when her boat capsized, costing her her life and the lives of two others assisting her.

Her boat contained seven tons of flour, sugar, and cooking oil that she had obtained through barter at one of the west coast towns of Trinidad, exchanging them for the tons of fresh shrimp she had brought with her. Others making the midnight trips would take with them anything of value to exchange for food and basic necessities, making the boats look like a floating garage sale: plastic chairs, house doors, ceramic cooking pots, and even exotic animals such as iguanas and macaws to trade for food.

Socialists promise that such things could never happen in the “paradise” they are determined to build.

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Complete text linked here.

June 19, 2017

Surge in Latino homeless population ‘a whole new phenomenon’ for Los Angeles

In 2016, Latinos made up 27% of the county’s homeless population; that number has rocketed to 35% in the last year.

Timoteo Arevalos never imagined he’d end up here, loitering for hours on a bench at Hollenbeck Park in Boyle Heights, using his backpack as his pillow.

He used to have a government job, but the recession hit and he was laid off. He then tried to scrape by as a dishwasher, but last fall his hours were cut and he couldn’t pay his rent.

Now, he is part of a rising number of Latinos who are living homeless in Los Angeles. Recent figures released by the county show that Latino homelessness shot up by 63% in the past year, a staggering number in a county that saw its overall homeless population soar by 23%, despite increasing efforts to get people off the street.

Nearly every demographic, including youth, families and veterans, showed increases in homelessness, but Latinos delivered one of the sharpest rises, adding more than 7,000 people to the surge.

“I would say it’s a whole new phenomenon,” said County Supervisor Hilda Solis, whose district saw Latino homelessness go up by 84%. “We have to put it on the radar and really think outside the box when we consider how to help this population.”

Homeless officials and outreach groups say Los Angeles’ rising rents and stale wages are the main drivers pushing many out of their homes.

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June 17, 2017

Homelessness and Real Compassion (Video)

Must watch Blonde in the Belly of the Beast video.

June 4, 2017

Report: 1 in 4 EU Citizens ‘On Verge of Total Poverty’ as Leaders Open Continent to Third World Migrant Invasion (Video)

Brussels could be facing a revolt, one in four people in the European Union live on the verge of poverty, third world immigrants have invaded and Europe is now a continent without leadership.

One in four citizens living within the failing European Union project lives on the verge of total poverty. A number of EU “leaders” thought that French President Emmanuel Macron would somehow fix problems within the bloc. One wonders the EU leadership’s logic behind thinking that adding another spineless, greedy globalist would be effective in “resetting” anything.

The statistics that were revealed at the Brussels Economic Forum only showed the growing income inequality that somehow “shocked” the greedy bastards running the worst governmental system after communism (and associated ideologies).

They try to rationalize their success by looking at the fall in unemployment, yet a tenth of those who work make well below the poverty line. The EU leadership will continue importing unskilled and unneeded immigrant and refugee populations, despite this. The more ignorant and culturally disparate the group, the better to import in the eyes of the “kind-hearted” EU shills.

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Complete text and video linked here.

June 1, 2017

L.A. County homelessness jumps a ‘staggering’ 23% as need far outpaces housing, new count shows

Youths made up the fastest growing homeless age group with those 18 to 24 up 64%, followed by those under 18 at 41%.

Los Angeles County’s homeless population has soared 23% over last year despite increasing success in placing people in housing, according to the latest annual count released Wednesday.

The sharp rise, to nearly 58,000, suggested that the pathway into homelessness continues to outpace intensifying efforts that — through rent subsidies, new construction, outreach and support services — got more than 14,000 people permanently off the streets last year.

“Staggering,” Los Angeles County Supervisor Janice Hahn said in a statement. “It is clear that if we are going to end the homeless crisis, we need to stem the overwhelming tide of people falling into homelessness.”

Said Leslie Evans, a West Adams resident active in efforts to combat homelessness in South Los Angeles: “These are scary numbers.”

The startling jump in homelessness affected every significant demographic group, including youth, families, veterans and the chronically homeless, according to the report. Homeless officials and political leaders pointed to steadily rising housing costs and stagnant incomes as the underlying cause.

Homelessness also increased sharply in the city of Los Angeles, where the count of just over 34,000 was up 20% from 2016.

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April 14, 2017

‘It’s a perfect storm’: homeless spike in rural California linked to Silicon Valley

The heartland best known for supplying nearly 25% of America’s food is experiencing a rise in homelessness that can be traced in part to the tech boom.

At first glance, the rusted metal pens in the central California town of Patterson look like an open-air prison block. But for Devani Riggs, “the cages”, abandoned since the days they were used to store the bounty of the self-proclaimed apricot capital of the world, play a very different role.

“This one was mine. That one was Patty and Pete,” said Riggs, a 3o-year-old homeless woman, adding that dozens of people had slept in the cramped enclosures.

California’s Central Valley is best known for supplying nearly 25% of the country’s food, including 40% of the fruit and nuts consumed each year. Yet today, backcountry places such as Patterson, population 22,000, are experiencing an increase in homelessness that can be traced, in part, to an unlikely sounding source: Silicon Valley.

The million-dollar home prices about 85 miles west, in San Francisco and San Jose, have pushed aspiring homeowners to look inland. Patterson’s population has doubled since the 2000 census. Average monthly rents have climbed from about $900 in 2014 to nearly $1,600 in recent months, according to the apartment database Rent Jungle, compounding the hardships of the foreclosure crisis, the shuttering of several local agricultural businesses and surging substance abuse rates.

“The rents in Patterson are crazy,” said Romelia Wiley, program manager of the local not-for-profit organization Community Housing & Shelter Services. “Why? I-5.”

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