Monthly Archives: May 2020

May 31, 2020

Politics As Usual (Video)

It’s an election year so yeah, this is politics as usual. Here’s the Simple Truth.

The Cold War: What We Saw | We Like Ike – Episode 6

In the years after World War II, Dwight David Eisenhower was arguably the most popular man on the planet. Ike’s prestige was so immense that in 1948, President Harry S Truman offered him the top slot on the 1948 Democratic ticket, with the offer to revert to his former position as Vice President under Eisenhower. It wasn’t enough.

May 30, 2020

Complete Classic Movie: The Highwaymen (2019)

The outlaws made headlines. The lawmen made history. From director John Lee Hancock (The Blind Side), THE HIGHWAYMEN follows the untold story of the legendary detectives who brought down Bonnie and Clyde. When the full force of the FBI and the latest forensic technology aren’t enough to capture the nation’s most notorious criminals, two former Texas Rangers (Kevin Costner and Woody Harrelson) must rely on their gut instincts and old school skills to get the job done.

Click here to watch The Highwaymen.

The Cold War: What We Saw | Death In The Kremlin – Episode 5 (Documentary)

Joseph Stalin, the architect and instigator of the 42-year Cold War, has died five years into the conflict. Across the Atlantic, a new Republican President, who had worked closely with Uncle Joe during World War II, is a mere two months in office. As the knives come out for the succession fight inside the Kremlin, will a brief window of opportunity be enough to completely reset the conflict?

In LA, rioters are trying to burn our American flag (Video)

“F*** the cops. F*** the flag. F*** America!”

Click here to see the video.

May 29, 2020

Complete Classic Movie: The Postman (1997)

2013, Post-Apocalyptic America. An unnamed wanderer retrieves a Postman’s uniform and undelivered bag of mail. He decides to pose as a postman and deliver the mail to a nearby town, bluffing that the United States government has been reinstated and tricking the town into feeding him. However, he reluctantly becomes a symbol of hope to the townspeople there who begin to remember the world that once was and giving them the courage to stand up to a tyrannical warlord and his army.

Click here to watch The Postman.

America’s Spectrum of Political Violence EXPLAINED (Video)

Felix Rex

Prof who says ‘MAGA equals Nazi’ advocates elections ‘where whites don’t vote’

She also referred to Trump supporters as “Nazis.”

A professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign recently referred to Trump supporters as Nazis and called for “an election cycle where whites don’t vote.” 

“Bear with me while I make my push for two election cycles where whites don’t vote,” tweeted English Professor Catherine Prendergast. “I realize this is crazy and impossible, but I truly believe a demonstrative sacrifice is needed on behalf of whites to correct this dire course we’re on.”

“As long as suppression/gerry-mandering  [sic] cannot be addressed because Republicans have neutralized Congress, stolen the executive branch, stacked the judiciary and thus created one party rule, we effectively have a franchise for whites, and a limited franchise for others,” Prendergast continued.

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Complete text linked here.

May 28, 2020

Complete Classic Movie: The Doors (1991)

Oliver Stone’s homage to 1960s rock group The Doors also doubles as a biography of the group’s late singer, the “Electric Poet” Jim Morrison. The movie follows Morrison from his days as a film student in Los Angeles to his death in Paris, France at age 27 in 1971. The movie features a tour-de-force performance by Val Kilmer, who not only looks like Jim Morrison’s long-lost twin brother, but also sounds so much like him that he did much of his own singing. It has been written that even the surviving Doors had trouble distinguishing Kilmer’s vocals from Morrison’s originals.

Click here to watch The Doors.

The Sickness in Our Food Supply

“The president and America’s meat eaters, not to mention its meat-plant workers, would never have found themselves in this predicament if not for the concentration of the meat industry, which has given us a supply chain so brittle that the closure of a single plant can cause havoc at every step, from farm to supermarket. Four companies now process more than 80 percent of beef cattle in America; another four companies process 57 percent of the hogs. A single Smithfield processing plant in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, processes 5 percent of the pork Americans eat. When an outbreak of Covid-19 forced the state’s governor to shut that plant down in April, the farmers who raise pigs committed to it were stranded.”

“Only when the tide goes out,” Warren Buffett observed, “do you discover who’s been swimming naked.” For our society, the Covid-19 pandemic represents an ebb tide of historic proportions, one that is laying bare vulnerabilities and inequities that in normal times have gone undiscovered. Nowhere is this more evident than in the American food system. A series of shocks has exposed weak links in our food chain that threaten to leave grocery shelves as patchy and unpredictable as those in the former Soviet bloc. The very system that made possible the bounty of the American supermarket—its vaunted efficiency and ability to “pile it high and sell it cheap”—suddenly seems questionable, if not misguided. But the problems the novel coronavirus has revealed are not limited to the way we produce and distribute food. They also show up on our plates, since the diet on offer at the end of the industrial food chain is linked to precisely the types of chronic disease that render us more vulnerable to Covid-19.

The juxtaposition of images in the news of farmers destroying crops and dumping milk with empty supermarket shelves or hungry Americans lining up for hours at food banks tells a story of economic efficiency gone mad. Today the US actually has two separate food chains, each supplying roughly half of the market. The retail food chain links one set of farmers to grocery stores, and a second chain links a different set of farmers to institutional purchasers of food, such as restaurants, schools, and corporate offices. With the shutting down of much of the economy, as Americans stay home, this second food chain has essentially collapsed. But because of the way the industry has developed over the past several decades, it’s virtually impossible to reroute food normally sold in bulk to institutions to the retail outlets now clamoring for it. There’s still plenty of food coming from American farms, but no easy way to get it where it’s needed.

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Complete text linked here.