Monthly Archives: November 2011

November 29, 2011

Legal immigrants join fight against Dream Act

“These people are taking seats in college away from our kids. Why should we reward their dishonest behavior?” Shakil Hamid, 44, an accountant in Gaithersburg who emigrated legally from Bangladesh in 1977


Ricky Campos Alfaro, 22, goes over biology notes with his sister, Marcela Campos Alfaro, 26, in Silver Spring. A student at Montgomery College, he tries to explain assignments to his sister to help reinforce his own understanding.

The 62-year-old Wheaton barber had earned a law degree in his native Thailand and waited eight years for a visa so he could move to the United States and begin a new life.

When he heard this year about the Maryland Dream Act, which would grant in-state college tuition discounts to illegal immigrants, he was outraged.

“I did the full legal process,” Anuchit Washirapunya, who is deaf and cannot speak English, wrote on a notepad as he hunched in his barber’s chair. “The illegal students have no right to work or stay here.”


Anuchit Washirapunya, a legal immigrant from Thailand, tends his barbershop in the Unique Thrift Shop Bazaar on Nov. 21, 2011, in Wheaton. He is opposed to illegal immigrants getting fee reductions for college tuition.

Until recently, Maryland’s legal and political battle over in-state tuition has been seen as pitting young illegal immigrants against native residents. But in the past few months, a petition drive by opponents of the measure has attracted a small but growing number of legal immigrants, who say that they, too, are being cheated.

The issue of what to do about the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants in the United States has roiled Republican presidential debates. In recent years, it has spawned national movements that advocate a range of solutions, including forcing all illegal immigrants to return home and granting them all legal amnesty.

[...]

Original source.


2nd Annual Beverly Hills Tea Party hosted by Pat Boone

Featuring: James Patrick Riley, Ed Ames, Pat Boone, Hugh Hewitt, Congressman Tom McClintock and many more…

Beverly Hills Tea Party website.


New York Times: The Future of the Obama Coalition

Preparations by Democratic operatives for the 2012 election make it clear for the first time that the party will explicitly abandon the white working class.

For decades, Democrats have suffered continuous and increasingly severe losses among white voters. But preparations by Democratic operatives for the 2012 election make it clear for the first time that the party will explicitly abandon the white working class.

All pretense of trying to win a majority of the white working class has been effectively jettisoned in favor of cementing a center-left coalition made up, on the one hand, of voters who have gotten ahead on the basis of educational attainment — professors, artists, designers, editors, human resources managers, lawyers, librarians, social workers, teachers and therapists — and a second, substantial constituency of lower-income voters who are disproportionately African-American and Hispanic.

It is instructive to trace the evolution of a political strategy based on securing this coalition in the writings and comments, over time, of such Democratic analysts as Stanley Greenberg and Ruy Teixeira. Both men were initially determined to win back the white working-class majority, but both currently advocate a revised Democratic alliance in which whites without college degrees are effectively replaced by well-educated socially liberal whites in alliance with the growing ranks of less affluent minority voters, especially Hispanics.

The 2012 approach treats white voters without college degrees as an unattainable cohort. The Democratic goal with these voters is to keep Republican winning margins to manageable levels, in the 12 to 15 percent range, as opposed to the 30-point margin of 2010 — a level at which even solid wins among minorities and other constituencies are not enough to produce Democratic victories.

[...]

Original source.

Think we’ve got it bad? Read about British expats whose lives have become a nightmare in violent, chaotic Greece

Every night, my husband Dimitri and I log on with foreboding to the strike website that has the most reliable information on the next day’s industrial action. That’s right: we have chosen to live in a country where we must consult a website devoted solely to strikes. It is dawning on us that we must be crazy.


Lost Idyll: Amanda and Dmitri with their daughters

Last month, I dropped off my two-year-old daughter Nicci Alise at her nursery during a downpour that lasted barely an hour. But this being Athens, that’s all it took for many of the shoddily maintained roads to flood. As I navigated the five-minute drive home, stinking bags of uncollected garbage sailed past in the torrents.

It could have been a scene from Slumdog Millionaire, except that I was driving past multi-million-euro mansions with gilded gates and cascading bougainvillea in one of Athens’s most affluent suburbs. The imagery was potent. Greece 2011: a country that has allowed itself to be capsized by its own accumulated waste.

It’s been barely a fortnight since new prime minister Lucas Papademos was parachuted in, and Greece’s so-called ‘national unity’ government has already devolved into a Mexican stand-off over the crucial signing of the eurozone rescue deal. But regardless of any new political scenario, Greece’s citizens still face years of brutal austerity when, even now, there are so many who haven’t been paid in months.

On that rainy day, the city’s refuse collectors were on strike, as they had been for the past fortnight, along with a good proportion of Greece’s labour force. We were in the grip of a 48-hour general strike. Airports, state schools and banks stopped working. They were joined by bakers, doctors, customs officials, taxi and bus drivers and even judges. Clothes shops and tax offices shut down, but the beggars who clog Athens’s road junctions cleaning windscreens were still hard at it.

[...]

Original source.


The Wall Street Occupiers as Mind Erasers

The left has organized for ten years or more to do things like the Occupation of Wall Street. Their real aim is to occupy something else: the media, and therefore the minds of Americans. It’s Occupy You!

Barack Obama may not be the kind of man you and I want as president, but he’s a very slick stage magician. That’s how he’s made it in politics, along with scandal bombs tossed by Axelrod. The 2008 Obama campaign was an endless series of stage tricks, epitomized by the infamous Greek styrofoam temple columns in Denver.

Stage magicians work a lot by distraction. A well-timed distraction makes people lose track of whatever they are thinking. If I’m an in-your-face street hustler and you’re beginning to get suspicious about me, all I have to do is tap your shirt and say, “Is that a van Heusen shirt? That looks really cool! I always wanted one of those!” By that time, you’ve lost that little suspicious thought. It’s been erased from your mind by distraction.

In “The Music Man,” Professor Harold Hill does it over and over again. So does Obama.

The left has organized for ten years or more to do things like the Occupation of Wall Street. Their real aim is to occupy something else: the media, and therefore the minds of Americans. It’s Occupy You!

[...]

Original source.

Cornel West: Ultimate Fight For Entitlements Will Be In “The Streets”

“It’s a major question of priorities here. That’s why the Occupy movement is so important because some of this is going to be fought in the streets. Civil disobedience does make a difference,” he said.

Video linked here.

“I think the problem is that the poor children, keep in mind it’s 42% of poor children who live at or near poverty, it’s 25% in poverty. Our audience needs to keep that in mind.” Cornel West said on MSNBC this afternoon.

“Poor children need more than just a $1,000 for their family, they need a war against poverty to make it a major priority in the way which we have a priority for Afghanistan, and a priority to bail out banks, and a priority to defend corporate interests when it comes to environmental issues,” West said about more and new entitlements for the poor.

Professor West didn’t just call for another war on poverty (the first war was fought by Lyndon B. Johnson), but went on to say that the push for more entitlements “is going to be fought in the streets.” West showered the Occupy movement with praise for making people aware of the issue.

[...]

Original source.


From a Global Perspective, the 99 Percent Are Actually the 1 Percent

Globally, one billion people would kill to live in that tent you’re inhabiting right now in that swank park you’re ruining. One-sixth of the world’s collective live in cardboard boxes.

As I watch the various college-aged Occupiers in their True Religion jeans talk about how bad they’ve got it while they tweet on their Macs during a catered lunch consisting of salmon filets with dill sauce as a Rasta Columbia grad student strums gently on his Washburn 118SW, I keep thinking, “You charmed babies don’t have it that bad.”

Matter of fact, from an earth angle, you are truly the fortunate ones and have hit the lifestyle lotto. Trust me, there are stacks of people from developing countries who would love to have what you ingrates whine about. Just ask an illegal alien.

For instance …

1. Clean Water. Please bear in mind, Occupiers, that when you crack open your Evian or get a glass of water from your dorm room faucet that 884 million people worldwide drink water out of crap puddles. Also, even though it doesn’t look like many of you cats bathe, when you do scrub your undercarriage during a five-minute shower, know that you have burned more aqua in that foray than a normal Joe in a third world county has in the last 24 hours. Just a little FYI.

2. Toilets. I know some of your crew like to forego toilets and port-a-potties and drop deuces on police cars and American flags and urinate in public, but please understand that the mere fact that you’ve got an option to use an American Standard truly tosses you into the cultural elite class. Yep, worldwide 40% of our globe’s population (2.6 billion people) is forced, out of poverty, to pop a squat in the brush because they are that broke.

[...]

Original source.


Kim Novak in Jeanne Eagels


The Monkees – Last Train to Clarksville


November 28, 2011

American Paintings – Norman Rockwell: Christmas Homecoming

This painting was Rockwell’s 257th overall of 322 total pictures featured on the cover of The Post. Rockwell’s career with the Post spanned 47 years, from his first cover illustration, Boy With Baby Carriage in 1916 to his last, Portrait of John F. Kennedy, in 1963.

View larger image here.

Norman Rockwell (American, 1894-1978). Christmas Homecoming, 1948. Cover illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, December 25, 1948. Oil on canvas. 35 1/2 x 33 1/2 in. (90.2 x 85.1 cm).

Norman Rockwell’s Christmas Homecoming appeared on the cover of The Saturday Evening Post published December 25, 1948.

The original oil on canvas painting, 35.5 x 33.5 inches or 90 x 85 cm, is currently part of the collection of the Norman Rockwell Museum of Stockbridge Massachusetts.

This painting was Rockwell’s 257th overall of 322 total pictures featured on the cover of The Post. Rockwell’s career with the Post spanned 47 years, from his first cover illustration, Boy With Baby Carriage in 1916 to his last, Portrait of John F. Kennedy, in 1963.

This was also the seventh Rockwell cover in 1948. The Post featured a Rockwell illustration on its cover seven times in 1948.

Source.